Home

Which Kind of JA Do You Have?

There are lots of different types of juvenile arthritis. Learn more about the one you have.

By Anne Krueger

Which Kind of JA Do You Have?

The most common type of juvenile arthritis is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Doctors and patients often use initials – JA or JIA – to talk about the diseases because it’s a lot easier! There are a lot of different types of arthritis. Here is a description  of types of JIA. As you get older, it’s smart to learn the name of your disease and to be able to describe it in a few words.

Learn How to Become Your Own JA Advocate

Oligoarthritis (AH-lih-go-arth-RIGH-tus)

  • The most common form of JA
  • Affects one to four joints during the first six months and more joints later on
  • Often starts on just one side of the body, usually in a large joint, like the knee or ankle
  • Sometimes causes eye inflammation, called uveitis
  • Is more common among girls than boys

Polyarthritis   (PAH-lee-arth-RIGH-tus)

  • Affects five or more joints during the first six months of the disease, often in the same joints on both sides of the body, such as both wrists or both knees  
  • Can cause problems in large joints that bear body weight, like hips and knees, as well as small joints, like those in the hands and feet
  • Can affect the neck and jaw
  • May have other symptoms including a low fever, bumps under the skin – called rheumatoid nodules (bumps) – and anemia, a low red blood cell count
  • Is more common among girls than boys

Systemic  (sis-TEM-ik)

  • Affects not only joints, but the whole body
  • Can cause swelling of internal organs, such as the heart and lungs
  • You may experience a high sudden fever that comes and goes and/or a pinkish rash on the chest and thighs – months before joint swelling and pain begins
  • Affects boys and girls equally

Enthesitis   (EN-the-SIGH-tus)

  • Causes swelling and pain of the entheses – that’s where muscles and tendons attach to bones
  • Causes pain and swelling in specific joints and other areas of the body, including the heels, toes, fingers, elbows, pelvis and chest
  • Is more common among boys than girls

Psoriatic (SOAR-ee-at-tik)

  • Causes joint swelling and pain as well as skin conditions
  • A flaky, red rash – behind the ears or on the eyelids, elbows, knees or scalp – may appear before or after joint problems show up
  • Can also cause bumps and rough spots on your fingernails

Undifferentiated

  • Arthritis that lasts for at least six weeks, but doesn’t match any of these descriptions perfectly  

3 Things JA Is Not

Do You Like To Color?

Nearly 300,000 Children Have JA
Nearly 300,000 Children Have JA

Print Coloring Page
Kids Get Arthritis, Too
Kids Get Arthritis, Too

Print Coloring Page
Movement is the Best Medicine
Movement is the Best Medicine

Print Coloring Page

 

Which Kind of JA Do You Have?

There are lots of different types of juvenile arthritis. Learn more about the one you have.

By Anne Krueger


Which Kind of JA Do You Have?

The most common type of juvenile arthritis is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Doctors and patients often use initials – JA or JIA – to talk about the diseases because it’s a lot easier! There are a lot of different types of arthritis. Here is a description  of types of JIA. As you get older, it’s smart to learn the name of your disease and to be able to describe it in a few words.

Learn How to Become Your Own JA Advocate

Oligoarthritis (AH-lih-go-arth-RIGH-tus)

  • The most common form of JA
  • Affects one to four joints during the first six months and more joints later on
  • Often starts on just one side of the body, usually in a large joint, like the knee or ankle
  • Sometimes causes eye inflammation, called uveitis
  • Is more common among girls than boys

Polyarthritis   (PAH-lee-arth-RIGH-tus)

  • Affects five or more joints during the first six months of the disease, often in the same joints on both sides of the body, such as both wrists or both knees  
  • Can cause problems in large joints that bear body weight, like hips and knees, as well as small joints, like those in the hands and feet
  • Can affect the neck and jaw
  • May have other symptoms including a low fever, bumps under the skin – called rheumatoid nodules (bumps) – and anemia, a low red blood cell count
  • Is more common among girls than boys

Systemic  (sis-TEM-ik)

  • Affects not only joints, but the whole body
  • Can cause swelling of internal organs, such as the heart and lungs
  • You may experience a high sudden fever that comes and goes and/or a pinkish rash on the chest and thighs – months before joint swelling and pain begins
  • Affects boys and girls equally

Enthesitis   (EN-the-SIGH-tus)

  • Causes swelling and pain of the entheses – that’s where muscles and tendons attach to bones
  • Causes pain and swelling in specific joints and other areas of the body, including the heels, toes, fingers, elbows, pelvis and chest
  • Is more common among boys than girls

Psoriatic (SOAR-ee-at-tik)

  • Causes joint swelling and pain as well as skin conditions
  • A flaky, red rash – behind the ears or on the eyelids, elbows, knees or scalp – may appear before or after joint problems show up
  • Can also cause bumps and rough spots on your fingernails

Undifferentiated

  • Arthritis that lasts for at least six weeks, but doesn’t match any of these descriptions perfectly  

3 Things JA Is Not