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Dalston B., Age 6

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Dalston B.

Dalston is now 6 years old, but it was at 19 months old that he began to walk with a limp. We took him to an orthopedist to see what might be the cause of the sudden change in walking. We were told that all children’s bones grow and change at this age and that there was nothing to be concerned about. 

A month later, Dalston was only walking on the very outside edge of his right foot and his right ankle was swollen. The pediatric orthopedist put him in a hard cast for a month to see if we could get the swelling down, but it didn’t work. So, we were referred to an oncologist to check for a tumor, but there was no tumor. We still felt like there had to be something wrong, but nobody could give us an answer. 

Months later, Dalston was still walking on the outside of his foot with a swollen ankle. He began to not want to walk. Before long, he had stopped walking all together. Back at the pediatric orthopedist, the doctor did another set of X-rays and put him back in a cast for another month. After a month, we took off the cast and his ankle was still swollen. That afternoon, the doctor ordered some blood work to see what was going on. Two days later, we were told Dalston had arthritis and the doctor referred us to a rheumatologist.

It then took a very long and painful nine months to get Dalston’s juvenile arthritis under control. He had his ankles and knees injected with steroids three different times. Dalston was three years old before the swelling in his ankle was under control. He went two years with no flare while taking medication.

Then in the fall, Dalston’s right eye started turning red. After a week, our local doctor told us to go to the eye doctor immediately. Dalston was diagnosed with uveitis. This is arthritis that affects the eye. Uveitis left unattended can cause permanent vision loss and eventually blindness. After trying different steroid eye drops and putting him on additional medication, the decision was made to try a different medication. Dalston now takes an infusion once a month. As of right now, he has no permanent eye damage.

Dalston is such a trooper. He takes his medication by IV once a month. He very seldom complains about it. He has had flare ups in many different joints, but his ankles and his eyes seem to be what bother him the most. On his medication, Dalston runs, plays baseball, and acts like a typical 6 year old.


Dalston B.

Dalston is now 6 years old, but it was at 19 months old that he began to walk with a limp. We took him to an orthopedist to see what might be the cause of the sudden change in walking. We were told that all children’s bones grow and change at this age and that there was nothing to be concerned about. 

A month later, Dalston was only walking on the very outside edge of his right foot and his right ankle was swollen. The pediatric orthopedist put him in a hard cast for a month to see if we could get the swelling down, but it didn’t work. So, we were referred to an oncologist to check for a tumor, but there was no tumor. We still felt like there had to be something wrong, but nobody could give us an answer. 

Months later, Dalston was still walking on the outside of his foot with a swollen ankle. He began to not want to walk. Before long, he had stopped walking all together. Back at the pediatric orthopedist, the doctor did another set of X-rays and put him back in a cast for another month. After a month, we took off the cast and his ankle was still swollen. That afternoon, the doctor ordered some blood work to see what was going on. Two days later, we were told Dalston had arthritis and the doctor referred us to a rheumatologist.

It then took a very long and painful nine months to get Dalston’s juvenile arthritis under control. He had his ankles and knees injected with steroids three different times. Dalston was three years old before the swelling in his ankle was under control. He went two years with no flare while taking medication.

Then in the fall, Dalston’s right eye started turning red. After a week, our local doctor told us to go to the eye doctor immediately. Dalston was diagnosed with uveitis. This is arthritis that affects the eye. Uveitis left unattended can cause permanent vision loss and eventually blindness. After trying different steroid eye drops and putting him on additional medication, the decision was made to try a different medication. Dalston now takes an infusion once a month. As of right now, he has no permanent eye damage.

Dalston is such a trooper. He takes his medication by IV once a month. He very seldom complains about it. He has had flare ups in many different joints, but his ankles and his eyes seem to be what bother him the most. On his medication, Dalston runs, plays baseball, and acts like a typical 6 year old.

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