Home

The JA Roller Coaster

Life with JA is never the same. Some days you're up; some days you're down.

By Anne Krueger

Everybody has good days and bad days when they’re growing up. You don’t do well on a test. Someone’s not nice to you. You wish your ears hadn’t grown faster than the rest of your face.

But sometimes kids with JA have really bad days. Like Can’t-get-out-of-bed-really-painful days or Why-is-this-happening-to-me? days. So, on top of the worries about “Where will my locker be in my new middle school?” and “Please don’t let me get a zit now!” there are concerns about swollen knees, fevers, and fingers that hurt too much to hold a pencil.

Here are some “bad days” in kids’ own words:
“I get tired of arthritis. Sometimes I have to catch up in school because I am either at the doctor’s or I am at home in bed with swelled up knees or feet.” – Jordan D., 9

“I can't play basketball anymore because I can't run or I'm in pain. I feel like I'm losing my friends because I'm never at school. It's hard … I miss lots of days of school because I can't sit on my bottom or my back hurts.” – Natasha C., 13

“Before I found out I had JIA I was sick as dog. I was tired every day. I was so tired one day I was asleep for 17 hours!” – Savannah, 10

And here are some “good days”:
“I have learned that there are many different kinds of arthritis. I am very thankful the type I have is manageable. I am a cheerleader and soccer player today. I love my doctors and how they have helped me.” – Paige B., 12

“People are surprised when I tell them that I have arthritis because I don’t look very different than other kids. But unlike other kids, I take a cancer drug every week plus daily medication to control my arthritis and it helps me try and lead a normal kid life." – Mikayla, 10

But most days are in-between days:
“Things aren't perfect. I still have days where I feel really lousy, and I have some pain regularly, but it's a lot better. Right now, I'm trying my best to forget the pain. I'm just like a normal kid, only with arthritis.” – Lindsay G., 12

Dealing with "Why Me?"

Tell Us Your Story 

 

Do You Like To Color?

Nearly 300,000 Children Have JA
Nearly 300,000 Children Have JA

Print Coloring Page
Kids Get Arthritis, Too
Kids Get Arthritis, Too

Print Coloring Page
Movement is the Best Medicine
Movement is the Best Medicine

Print Coloring Page

 

The JA Roller Coaster

Life with JA is never the same. Some days you're up; some days you're down.

By Anne Krueger


Everybody has good days and bad days when they’re growing up. You don’t do well on a test. Someone’s not nice to you. You wish your ears hadn’t grown faster than the rest of your face.

But sometimes kids with JA have really bad days. Like Can’t-get-out-of-bed-really-painful days or Why-is-this-happening-to-me? days. So, on top of the worries about “Where will my locker be in my new middle school?” and “Please don’t let me get a zit now!” there are concerns about swollen knees, fevers, and fingers that hurt too much to hold a pencil.

Here are some “bad days” in kids’ own words:
“I get tired of arthritis. Sometimes I have to catch up in school because I am either at the doctor’s or I am at home in bed with swelled up knees or feet.” – Jordan D., 9

“I can't play basketball anymore because I can't run or I'm in pain. I feel like I'm losing my friends because I'm never at school. It's hard … I miss lots of days of school because I can't sit on my bottom or my back hurts.” – Natasha C., 13

“Before I found out I had JIA I was sick as dog. I was tired every day. I was so tired one day I was asleep for 17 hours!” – Savannah, 10

And here are some “good days”:
“I have learned that there are many different kinds of arthritis. I am very thankful the type I have is manageable. I am a cheerleader and soccer player today. I love my doctors and how they have helped me.” – Paige B., 12

“People are surprised when I tell them that I have arthritis because I don’t look very different than other kids. But unlike other kids, I take a cancer drug every week plus daily medication to control my arthritis and it helps me try and lead a normal kid life." – Mikayla, 10

But most days are in-between days:
“Things aren't perfect. I still have days where I feel really lousy, and I have some pain regularly, but it's a lot better. Right now, I'm trying my best to forget the pain. I'm just like a normal kid, only with arthritis.” – Lindsay G., 12

Dealing with "Why Me?"

Tell Us Your Story