Home

Your School Action Plan

Getting through the day at school doesn't have to be a hassle. Here are tips to make it easier.

By Anne Krueger

Font Size: BiggerSmaller
 

Sometimes going to school with JA can be like an obstacle course. Those early mornings, those steps, gym class, and those heavy books! It’s like monsters crawling out of every hallway! But if you’re prepared, JA ninja, you can handle anything!

Your parents may be able to work with the school on plans called 504s or IEPs. Ask them about that. In the meantime, here are some ways to warrior through your days.

To PE or not to PE
You may not be able to do gym class.
ACTION: Make sure you or your parents talk to your school to get this all arranged so that you don’t have to feel awkward while everyone else is doing burpees. You might be able to do part of PE or have to skip it completely. Maybe you can go do something else or work in a classroom with a favorite teacher instead.

Getting around
You have trouble traveling long distances inside and around school
ACTION: Let your parents or the school know. Help is possible. Someone may be able to carry your books or you may be able to keep a set of books at home and in each classroom. The school can work out a way to assist you from class to class. Help identify the problem and you are halfway to finding the solution!

Such a pain in the you-know-what
Hey, that desk chair is biting into your behind.
ACTION: Think about bringing a pillow for the seat. Hey, explain to the teacher and maybe she’ll let everybody bring a cushion so you won’t stand out.

Those tardy slips are piling up!
You’re not alone if you’re sore and stiff in the morning and need some extra time to warm up. Many teens with JA feel the same way.
ACTION: Taking time for a warm bath or for joints to “wake up” could mean you’ll be late. More than once. Some kids get very embarrassed about being tardy. You and your parents can talk to your teachers and the school about this so that you don’t get in trouble for starting late.  

Medicine dispensing
You have to take medicine at school.
ACTION: You’ll probably have to go to the office or to the school nurse, if there is one available. You and your parents can get this all arranged each year before school even starts. Don’t worry; you won’t be the only high schooler doing this.

Help, my [fill in the blank] isn’t working today
You’re having one of those JA days. Your fingers aren’t working very well today. Your knees don’t want to climb the stairs. You really can’t take one more minute of pain. What to do?
ACTION: It’s good to be prepared. Have an emergency buddy (a teacher, friend, or parent) who can be contacted in a time of need in case you have to go home or need an extra pair of hands to help you with something. Ask for extra time to take a test or do homework if you’re clumsy with the pencil. Don’t feel bad; Teens with attention disorders and other issues get more time, too. It’s not cheating. Everyone needs a little help sometimes.

Getting sporty
Can you play a school sport?
ACTION: You’ll have to learn how to manage your energy (or lack of it), but lots of kids with JA do play sports when they’re in remission or their symptoms are under control. Jordan S.  was the caption of his football team! It’s great if your coach knows about your JA so he can help you succeed.  

Go cyber
There’s no way you can get to school. Sometimes kids just can’t make it into school because of pain, mobility, or recovery from a treatment or surgery.
ACTION: Friends can bring your homework to you or you can take cyber classes from home. It’s a good way to keep up with classes, but it can be lonely. If you can, invite friends over after school or on the weekends for some social time. Then you’ll still know what’s going on when you’re well enough to get back to class!

 
 

 

About Me: Stories by Teens With JA

 
Drake M.

Drake M., Age 14

I am a wrestler, football player and I do everything else any other 14 year old boy does.

Read Drake M.'s Story
 
Crystal

Crystal, Age 13

Hi, I'm Crystal. I was diagnosed with JIA (Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis) almost 2 years ago.

Read Crystal's Story
 
See All Stories by Teens With JA
 
Submit Your Story
 
 

Your School Action Plan

Getting through the day at school doesn't have to be a hassle. Here are tips to make it easier.

By Anne Krueger


Sometimes going to school with JA can be like an obstacle course. Those early mornings, those steps, gym class, and those heavy books! It’s like monsters crawling out of every hallway! But if you’re prepared, JA ninja, you can handle anything!

Your parents may be able to work with the school on plans called 504s or IEPs. Ask them about that. In the meantime, here are some ways to warrior through your days.

To PE or not to PE
You may not be able to do gym class.
ACTION: Make sure you or your parents talk to your school to get this all arranged so that you don’t have to feel awkward while everyone else is doing burpees. You might be able to do part of PE or have to skip it completely. Maybe you can go do something else or work in a classroom with a favorite teacher instead.

Getting around
You have trouble traveling long distances inside and around school
ACTION: Let your parents or the school know. Help is possible. Someone may be able to carry your books or you may be able to keep a set of books at home and in each classroom. The school can work out a way to assist you from class to class. Help identify the problem and you are halfway to finding the solution!

Such a pain in the you-know-what
Hey, that desk chair is biting into your behind.
ACTION: Think about bringing a pillow for the seat. Hey, explain to the teacher and maybe she’ll let everybody bring a cushion so you won’t stand out.

Those tardy slips are piling up!
You’re not alone if you’re sore and stiff in the morning and need some extra time to warm up. Many teens with JA feel the same way.
ACTION: Taking time for a warm bath or for joints to “wake up” could mean you’ll be late. More than once. Some kids get very embarrassed about being tardy. You and your parents can talk to your teachers and the school about this so that you don’t get in trouble for starting late.  

Medicine dispensing
You have to take medicine at school.
ACTION: You’ll probably have to go to the office or to the school nurse, if there is one available. You and your parents can get this all arranged each year before school even starts. Don’t worry; you won’t be the only high schooler doing this.

Help, my [fill in the blank] isn’t working today
You’re having one of those JA days. Your fingers aren’t working very well today. Your knees don’t want to climb the stairs. You really can’t take one more minute of pain. What to do?
ACTION: It’s good to be prepared. Have an emergency buddy (a teacher, friend, or parent) who can be contacted in a time of need in case you have to go home or need an extra pair of hands to help you with something. Ask for extra time to take a test or do homework if you’re clumsy with the pencil. Don’t feel bad; Teens with attention disorders and other issues get more time, too. It’s not cheating. Everyone needs a little help sometimes.

Getting sporty
Can you play a school sport?
ACTION: You’ll have to learn how to manage your energy (or lack of it), but lots of kids with JA do play sports when they’re in remission or their symptoms are under control. Jordan S.  was the caption of his football team! It’s great if your coach knows about your JA so he can help you succeed.  

Go cyber
There’s no way you can get to school. Sometimes kids just can’t make it into school because of pain, mobility, or recovery from a treatment or surgery.
ACTION: Friends can bring your homework to you or you can take cyber classes from home. It’s a good way to keep up with classes, but it can be lonely. If you can, invite friends over after school or on the weekends for some social time. Then you’ll still know what’s going on when you’re well enough to get back to class!