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Parent-Teacher Conferences: Six Ways to Ensure Success

When meeting with your child’s teacher, try these six tips.

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  1. Write notes before the conference about important topics to cover. Parents may want the teacher to know about the child's home life, personality, problems, habits or hobbies. Parents might want to address concerns about school policies or programs or the child's progress.

  2. Ask your children what they would like you to talk about with their teachers. Also, ask your kids what they think are their best and worst subjects – and have them explain why.

  3. Stay calm during the conference. Remember, parents and teachers are there for only one reason: to help the child.

  4. Ask important questions first, in case you run out of time.

  5. Try to ask questions such as: Is my child in different groups for different subjects? Why? How well does my child get along with other children? What are his or her best and most challenging subjects? Is my child working to his or her ability?

  6. Find out specific ways you can help your child perform better in school. At home, discuss these strategies with your child and let him know that you and the teacher care what happens.
 

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Parent-Teacher Conferences: Six Ways to Ensure Success

When meeting with your child’s teacher, try these six tips.


  1. Write notes before the conference about important topics to cover. Parents may want the teacher to know about the child's home life, personality, problems, habits or hobbies. Parents might want to address concerns about school policies or programs or the child's progress.

  2. Ask your children what they would like you to talk about with their teachers. Also, ask your kids what they think are their best and worst subjects – and have them explain why.

  3. Stay calm during the conference. Remember, parents and teachers are there for only one reason: to help the child.

  4. Ask important questions first, in case you run out of time.

  5. Try to ask questions such as: Is my child in different groups for different subjects? Why? How well does my child get along with other children? What are his or her best and most challenging subjects? Is my child working to his or her ability?

  6. Find out specific ways you can help your child perform better in school. At home, discuss these strategies with your child and let him know that you and the teacher care what happens.