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Seven Tips for Managing Your Child’s Arthritis Flares

Find out how you can help your ease your child's pain during a flare.

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A flare is the term for that period of time when your child's juvenile arthritis is more active. She may not feel well overall, she may have joint pain or her joints may be swollen, pink or stiff. Here are a few ways you can help your child through a flare:

  • Make sure your child takes medicine on time – often flares are the result of missed dosages.
  • Call your child's doctor if you suspect your child is having a flare.
  • Apply ice to sore joints for 20 minutes at a time with 10 minute breaks.
  • After the first 24 hours, heat may be soothing for sore joints. Ask the doctor to teach you massage for achy joints.
  • Change your child's activities so they are easier to do when they are in pain.  
  • Keep your child active to keep up their muscle strength and flexibility.
  • Ask your child's doctor about using splints at night. Splints can prevent joints from moving around and causing more pain. 

 

 

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Seven Tips for Managing Your Child’s Arthritis Flares

Find out how you can help your ease your child's pain during a flare.


A flare is the term for that period of time when your child's juvenile arthritis is more active. She may not feel well overall, she may have joint pain or her joints may be swollen, pink or stiff. Here are a few ways you can help your child through a flare:

  • Make sure your child takes medicine on time – often flares are the result of missed dosages.
  • Call your child's doctor if you suspect your child is having a flare.
  • Apply ice to sore joints for 20 minutes at a time with 10 minute breaks.
  • After the first 24 hours, heat may be soothing for sore joints. Ask the doctor to teach you massage for achy joints.
  • Change your child's activities so they are easier to do when they are in pain.  
  • Keep your child active to keep up their muscle strength and flexibility.
  • Ask your child's doctor about using splints at night. Splints can prevent joints from moving around and causing more pain.